The Luis Gutierrez Bridge Spans the Santa Cruz River; It Also Links Both Parts of a Divided Community and Makes Connections to the Past

by Alice Whittenburg At 8:45 on October 14, if a thin veil of high clouds hadn’t occluded the morning sun, a work of solar art commemorating the Tucson Pressed Brick Company would have appeared on the Luis Gutierrez Bridge on Tucson’s West Side. Because of those clouds, seven people, including myself, who had gathered on …

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Say It Like It Is Instead of What It Isn’t

I’m in favor of that and you should be as well. In this case, what it isn’t is the unemployment rates listed by your and my devious government. Does anyone actually believe—feel in their bones—that the current rate of those without jobs in America is a mere 6.7 percent? That’s what the bean-counters in Washington …

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The UAW Leadership Shake Up and the Need to Speak Up for Unions

Union Power

Ever since Ronald Reagan busted the air traffic controllers union (PATCO) in 1981, [1] the union movement in the United States has been in decline. Back then, one in 5 workers in the U.S. was a union member; today that number has fallen to one in 10. This decline in the unionized workforce, in turn, …

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On Reading “Notes for a Feminist Manifesto” While in My Rust Belt Hometown

2018 Women's Strike in Spain

Though the Occupy movement continues to fade from public memory, references to our signature chant of “We are the 99%!” still abound. They are of interest either because we feel ripped off when mainstream political candidates claim to be and/or represent 99-percenters or because we are glad to be reminded of the cooperation and solidarity …

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The Bisbee Deportation, 1917

Picture of IWW members under armed guard being put on trains

One hundred years ago Bisbee, Arizona, hosted the beginning of the defeat of one of the world’s boldest and most effective labor organizations, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) or Wobblies, when 1186 striking copper mine workers were rounded up, loaded into cattle cars, then dumped in the desert of southwest New Mexico at …

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